Gorilla Blog: 17 June 2016

Apollo is grounded by his mother, while other gorillas continue to form strong social bonds.

Gorilla Blog: 10 June 2016

Play behavior amongst gorillas is an especially important form of communication.

Gorilla Behavior Research

Gorilla Behavior Research

Gorilla Behavior Research

Photo courtesy XXX Photo courtesy XXX Photo courtesy XXX Gorilla Behavior Research gorilla-behavior-tab-set600rtbs_arrows#2951c2 ‌ Current Status Research can help zoos evaluate animal welfare. Kelly and Ashley, two undergraduate students from North Carolina State University, are conducting a study where they observe gorilla behavior and assess their enrichment to do just that. What’s enrichment? It is…

Gorilla Blog: 20 May 2016

Gorilla Blog: 20 May 2016 20 May 2016 We’ve just finished up our first two weeks of observations and they went great! We are observing seven gorillas altogether—Mosuba, Rosie, Olympia, Jamani, Hadari, Apollo, and Bomassa. Mosuba, or "Mo," is the silverback male and leader of the troop. Rosie is the oldest adult female and Hadari, a…

Snake Mark/Recapture

Photo courtesy North Carolina Zoological Park Photo courtesy North Carolina Zoological Park Photo courtesy North Carolina Zoological Park Snake Mark/Recapture snake-markrecapture-tab-set600rtbs_arrows#2951c2 ‌ Current Status blah blah blah Newest Snake Mark/Recapture articles... 22 Feb 2016 Snake Mark/Recapture Study – 2015 | A group of herpetology researchers gathered data throughout 2015 as part of a mark/recapture study…

Snake Mark/Recapture Study – 2015

A group of herpetology researchers gathered data throughout 2015 as part of a mark/recapture study in order to learn more about the native snakes found on the grounds of the North Carolina Zoo.

Camera Trapping Update – December 2015

The North Carolina Zoo is in the data-gathering phase of a camera trapping project focused on predator species found in the Zoo’s undeveloped areas.

Camera Trapping

Photo courtesy Shyamala Ratnayeke Photo courtesy John Groves Photo courtesy U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Camera Trappingcamera-trapping-tab-set600rtbs_arrows#2951c2 ‌Project HistoryCurrent Status A major research effort based on the use of camera traps started at the North Carolina Zoo in 2011. This particular project focused on learning more about predator species found on the Zoo's undeveloped land.…

Camera Trapping Research

Researchers use camera traps to learn how native animals make use of undeveloped lands near the North Carolina Zoo. This study, from 2011, focused on predators and their hunting preferences.

1 2